Managing ADHD begins with information

At Creekmore Clinic, we are all familiar with the signs, challenges . . . and triumphs regarding ADHD. We provide this page to allow information regarding innovative technology from QBTech that aids greatly in ADHD diagnosis and treatment. Please take a few moments to read more.

Helpful Videos

Qbtech News and Research

  • ADHD, schools and the role of objective data

    Michael Walsh is a Clinical Nurse Specialist for HSE South and South Wexford Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, with extensive experience working with patients being assessed and treated for a range of mental health and neurodevelopmental conditions including ADHD.

  • ADHD care – optimizing treatment utilizing data

    ADHD care is not just about ruling in or ruling out ADHD. For those who do receive a diagnosis, the very least they and their families should expect is close attention detail to monitor treatment to ensure it is working to full effect.

  • ADHD Assessment and treatment – can you quantify activity?

    How can you tell if a patient is more hyperactive than their peers? Face-to-face it is sometimes the most noticeable symptom in younger individuals, particularly males. However, measuring all activity including much subtler movements like foot tapping and fidgeting for example, and having something to compare it to is more challenging.

  • A clinician’s view: life before and after QbTest

    Michael Walsh is a Clinical Nurse Specialist for HSE South and South Wexford Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service with extensive experience working with patients being assessed and treated for a range of mental health and neurodevelopmental conditions including ADHD.

  • Multifactorial: technology and the modern ADHD assessment

    Dr  Venkat  Reddy  MBBS, MRCP, FRCPCH, Consultant Neurodevelopmental Paediatrician and Lead Clinician is a technology disruptor; a passionate advocate for the use of technology across all aspects of modern healthcare. 

  • New study finds ADHD Test serves as a better indicator of medication effects

    In a study of 77 adult patients, clinical interviews, self-rating scales, and QbTest, an objective ADHD test measuring attention, impulsivity, and activity, were used at baseline and at two follow-up appointments after starting treatment.